Category Archives: Health policy

‘Climate change and covid-19: what have we learnt?’ KCL Alumni Zoom seminar Wednesday 22nd 6:30 pm CET

The pandemic has had a profound impact on our environment. Lockdown measures have resulted in significantly reduced levels of air pollution, and what may be the first time we have begun to see noticeable changes in the world we live in. Despite this, it seems that the climate emergency has been put on hold while attention and resources have focused on fighting the pandemic.

As part of our King’s Experts Series, join us as we ask our panel: What lessons can we learn from the pandemic when it comes to climate change and the environment? Will coming out of lockdown undo the progress already made? What are some of the parallels that can be drawn between the impact of the pandemic and climate change?

The event is organised by and for KCL Alumni but open to all interested parties and you can sign up here:

https://www.kcl.ac.uk/events/climate-change-and-covid-19-what-have-we-learned

For those who are unable to join via Zoom, we will also be live-streaming the discussion on our Alumni YouTube channel.

At this event

Frans Berkhout

Frans Berkhout

Executive Dean, Faculty of Social Science & Public Policy

2017_Silvia Camporesi

Silvia Camporesi

Senior Lecturer in Bioethics and Society

Mark Mulligan

Mark Mulligan

Head of the Department of Geography

 

Sponsors should be held responsible if their athletes dope

Camporesi S, & Knuckles JA  (2014). Shifting the burden of proof in doping: lessons from environmental sustainability applied to high-performance sport. Reflective Practice15(1), 106-118.

One of Lance Armstrong's former sponsors...

One of Lance Armstrong’s former sponsors…

In this paper, co-authored with James A. Knuckles, we analyse the role of incentives in high-performance sports, borrowing concepts from sustainability policies and applying them to the context of doping in sports. Professional athletes discount their future health in exchange for desired enhanced performances. In the same way, many industrialised societies discount future environmental health for short-term economic returns, jeopardising the future of the planet. We propose a solution to alter this discounting, by applying the lessons from environmental sustainability, which has long proposed shifting the burden of proof away from regulators in order to alter the practice of discounting the planet’s future health for current economic gains, to high-performance sports.

We argue that the burden of proof for doping should not rest on the athlete or the team of sports doctors, but should rest instead on the sponsors. Under this system, WADA would retain and strengthen its own testing, and impose severe penalties on the sponsors of any athlete found to be doping.

Only by making the companies accountable for the athletes they sponsor, can we de-link sponsorship money from a win-at-all-costs mentality in sports that in turn leads to doping, and subsequently to discounting the future health of the athlete.