Tag Archives: enhancement

Genetic Advantages in Sports: When Do They Count as “Doping”? ELSI Friday Forum, Friday December 9th 12 pm EST

Join us on Friday, December 9, 2022, for the next ELSI Friday Forum: Genetic Advantages in Sports: When Do They Count as “Doping”?

What is the essence of sports, and how does that impact the way doping is defined? The sports world is already preparing for an inevitable wave of “gene-doping” as gene-transfer technologies advance and become more widely available to all ages. On the one side, genetic modifications that improve human performance can be considered enhancements that threaten fair competition. However, gene transfer technologies can be used for a wide range of characteristics, thus blurring the lines between therapy and enhancement. This gray zone requires reflections and decisions on whether there is a moral difference between a genetic advantage that is inherited versus acquired. Could gene-transfer be a way of leveling the playing field? Or does it threaten the essence of sports fundamentally?

Panelist: Sarah Polcz, JSD, MSc, JD (Stanford Law School)
Panelist: Silvia Camporesi, PhD, PhD (King’s College London)
Moderator: Thomas H. Murray, PhD (The Hastings Center)

To continue the conversation please join fellow audience members for an informal discussion in a Zoom meeting immediately following the forum. The link will be placed in the Zoom Chat during the forum. For those who cannot attend the live event, the forum will be recorded and archived on the ELSIhub Video page.

Closed captioning and/or transcripts will be provided for live and recorded events.

By registering for an ELSIhub event, attendees agree to abide by the ELSIhub Code of Conduct: https://elsihub.org/news/code-conductTime

Dec 9, 2022 12:00 PM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Webinar logo

To register for the webinar click here:

https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Sr7ZBGtJTCGhgjO_2m0eXg

Podcast interview for UC Medical Humanities Press

It was great to be back at the Department of Anthropology, History and Social Medicine at UCSF for a few days last week. During my visit I gave a talk as part of the Culpeper Seminar Series on ethics of CRISPR genome editing technologies. I was also interviewed by Professor Brian Dolan, Director of UC Medical Humanities Press and Professor of Social Medicine at UCSF, about my book “From Bench to Bedside, to Track and Field: The Context of Enhancement and its Ethical Relevance” published for UC Medical Humanities Press.

In the podcast (available here) I discuss genome editing technologies to alter the human embryo and to select children’s traits, genetic technologies to enhance athletic performance, and doping in professional sport.

The podcast is available here:

My book forthcoming for UC Perspectives in Medical Humanities Book Series

I am very pleased to announce that my PhD thesis is forthcoming for the UC Perspectives in Medical Humanities Book Series, with title “From bench, to bedside, to track & Field: the context of enhancement and its ethical relevance“, and with a foreword by Professor Søren Holm of Manchester University. The series publishes scholarship produced or reviewed under the auspices of the University of California Medical Humanities Consortium, a multi-campus collaborative of faculty, students and trainees in the humanities, medicine, and health sciences.The editor of the series is Professor Brian Dolan.

camporesi_cover_6x9-202x300From the back cover:

What is it to talk about gene transfer, gene therapy, and gene doping? Is choosing deafness with preimplantation genetic diagnosis an ethical way to carry on a cultural bloodline? What are the ethical and social implications of genetic testing to identify precocious talents? Should sponsors be held responsible for the doping behaviours of their athletes?These are only some of the questions that Dr. Silvia Camporesi addresses in this book, through a contextual, bottom up approach based on real-world ethical dilemmas. This book represents a unique contribution to the debate on enhancement technologies as it spans from the bench of molecular biology where the technologies are being developed, to the bedside of a clinical trial where they are used for selective reproduction or for first-in-human gene therapy studies, to the track & field where they are being applied to enhance human athletic performance. These investigations address current debates regarding the resurgence of eugenics in relation to genetic technologies, and provide a clear and much needed ethical autopsy of contemporary genetic practices.

Paperback | 978-0-9889865-4-1 | October 2014 | pp 185 | $24.95

http://ucmedicalhumanitiespress.com/books/from-bench-to-bedside-to-track-field/