Tag Archives: genome editing

Podcast interview for UC Medical Humanities Press

It was great to be back at the Department of Anthropology, History and Social Medicine at UCSF for a few days last week. During my visit I gave a talk as part of the Culpeper Seminar Series on ethics of CRISPR genome editing technologies. I was also interviewed by Professor Brian Dolan, Director of UC Medical Humanities Press and Professor of Social Medicine at UCSF, about my book “From Bench to Bedside, to Track and Field: The Context of Enhancement and its Ethical Relevance” published for UC Medical Humanities Press.

In the podcast (available here) I discuss genome editing technologies to alter the human embryo and to select children’s traits, genetic technologies to enhance athletic performance, and doping in professional sport.

The podcast is available here:

I will be at the Belfast Imagine! Festival of Ideas March 19th

I look forward to participating in the Imagine! Festival of Ideas in Belfast on March 19th.

I will be discussing the socio-ethical implications of CRISPR genome editing. FOr more information and to register (free event!) click here:

https://imaginebelfast.com/events/editing-the-genome/

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More on CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing debate: need to engage public beyond embryo modification

With Dr Lara Marks I published an article for the Conversation commenting on the recent application by researchers at Francis Crick institute to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority to use CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technologies to the human embryos:

“This is a controversial move, which would make the UK the only country in the world apart from China to carry out such research. […] The recent call by US scientists for a temporary pause “in the application of germ-line modification for clinical application in humans while the implications of such activity are discussed” has added a new intensity to the debate and reveals a potential bioethical divide between the US and the UK. The proposed moratorium has been hailed in some quarters as a positive step toward preserving the public’s trust and safety but because of its narrow focus on the germ-line, it also prevents alternative views from surfacing in the debate and constrains the boundaries of the much called-for public engagement with the issue”.

To continue reading click here:

https://theconversation.com/the-public-must-speak-up-about-gene-editing-beyond-embryo-modification-48623