My book forthcoming for UC Perspectives in Medical Humanities Book Series

I am very pleased to announce that my PhD thesis is forthcoming for the UC Perspectives in Medical Humanities Book Series, with title “From bench, to bedside, to track & Field: the context of enhancement and its ethical relevance“, and with a foreword by Professor Søren Holm of Manchester University. The series publishes scholarship produced or reviewed under the auspices of the University of California Medical Humanities Consortium, a multi-campus collaborative of faculty, students and trainees in the humanities, medicine, and health sciences.The editor of the series is Professor Brian Dolan.

camporesi_cover_6x9-202x300From the back cover:

What is it to talk about gene transfer, gene therapy, and gene doping? Is choosing deafness with preimplantation genetic diagnosis an ethical way to carry on a cultural bloodline? What are the ethical and social implications of genetic testing to identify precocious talents? Should sponsors be held responsible for the doping behaviours of their athletes?These are only some of the questions that Dr. Silvia Camporesi addresses in this book, through a contextual, bottom up approach based on real-world ethical dilemmas. This book represents a unique contribution to the debate on enhancement technologies as it spans from the bench of molecular biology where the technologies are being developed, to the bedside of a clinical trial where they are used for selective reproduction or for first-in-human gene therapy studies, to the track & field where they are being applied to enhance human athletic performance. These investigations address current debates regarding the resurgence of eugenics in relation to genetic technologies, and provide a clear and much needed ethical autopsy of contemporary genetic practices.

Paperback | 978-0-9889865-4-1 | October 2014 | pp 185 | $24.95

http://ucmedicalhumanitiespress.com/books/from-bench-to-bedside-to-track-field/

Brad Partridge comments on MJA Insight on my PEHM article on Sport’s guinea pigs

Many thanks to Brad Partridge, NHMRC Research Fellow in Public Health based at the University of Queensland, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, for his nice comments to my article with Mike McNamee on guinea pigs in elite sport. You can read below an excerpt of the comment.

[...] In an article published in Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine, British bioethicist Silvia Camporesi and philosopher Michael McNamee argue that many athletes are essentially vulnerable research subjects and the growing translation of innovations directly into athletic environments for performance enhancement amounts to unregulated clinical research. [...] Camporesi and McNamee suggest the need for a framework to establish claims about performance enhancement and risks to health. Perhaps greater transparency and visibility will encourage more compliance with the WADA Code and reduce the incentive to treat athletes as guinea pigs. This system could also serve to justify the inclusion of substances and methods on the WADA Prohibited List.”

If interested in reading more, see here on MJA Insight.

Call for Chapters: Defining Sport

  • Working Title: “Defining Sport: Contemporary Explorations”
  • Publisher: Proposal will be submitted to Lexington Books
  • Editor: Shawn E. Klein, PhD; sklein@rockford.edu

The focus of the book is to bring new scholarly attention to the issues and questions involved in defining and explaining the nature of sport. There are several classic works that treat these issues, but with the growth of the philosophy of sport a renewed focus on how to define and conceptualize sport is needed.

Chapter ideas:

  • Analyses of common approaches to defining sport (or related concepts such as competition or athlete) in the philosophy of sport literature. (E.g. Bernard Suits, essentialism, formalism, interpretivism, and externalism.)
  • New approaches to defining sport (and related concepts).
  • Examination of borderline cases  (e.g. Motor Sports; Animal Sports, cyber-sports, fantasy sports)
  • Analysis of problematic cases ( e.g violent/blood sports)
  • Discussions of methodological differences between philosophy and other disciplines in terms of defining sport and related concepts.

If you are interested in contributing a book chapter to this volume, please send a tentative title, a brief abstract for review (500 words) and C.V or short bio, to the book editor: Shawn E. Klein: sklein@rockford.edu

  • Abstract deadline: July 11, 2014
  • Notification of abstract acceptance by July 25, 2014
  • Chapter Manuscript Deadline: December 12, 2014
  • Length: 6000-10,000 words (inclusive of references and notes).
  • Manuscripts should conform to Chicago style.

PDF: Call for Papers Defining Sport